Micro ATX Mobo – Motherboard Removal Tutorial

As a computer repair business owner, I also recycle computers. I acquired a PowerSpec B628 computer. This computer had a bad motherboard that I tested as failing.

I decided to try to salvage this computer case. These are instructions showing you how to remove the motherboard from a desktop computer. The current bad motherboard was a G41T-TM Rev 1.0.

First you want to disconnect power from this computer and wall outlet. Then you can disconnect any power, fans and device cables. You do NOT need to remove any case fans or power supply, from the case if you do NOT want to.

Also, you want to remove power, HD audio, and USB cables from motherboard. Remove any cables from hard drive(s), optical drive(s), etc. from the motherboard. Remove a twenty four pin and a four pin power cable from the motheboard.

You do NOT have to remove the heatsink and fan if you don't want to. Once all cables are disconnected from the motherboard, then you will need to remove screws that hold down this mother on the case. Depending on the brand of motherboard you may need to remove six, seven, or eight screws.

It just depends on the brand. I had to remove six screws that held this motherboard in place. You want to pull out this board assertively, but you don't need to rip it out. You may need to pull the motherboard away from the back of the case towards the front of the case to get it out.

Once you have removed the motherboard, you just reverse what you performed to instals another motherboard. You can try to salvage this case like I plan to. Another option is to order the same replacement motherboard online.

This is an older computer so it might not be cost effictive for me to replace this same motherboard. I have some spare micro atx dual core motherboars, so I might just place one of this in this computer.

Leave a Comment
Do You Still Need Help? Schedule time with Aaron, to get expert remote support. Chat with me for immediate support.





About Author Aaron J. Berg



Aaron J. Berg is the owner of Anet Computers, host of the Reality PC podcast, and blogger at AnetComputers.com. For over thirteen years, he worked for fortune 500 companies and the United States Federal government supporting computers. Now he helps you solve your most common computer problems.

Leave a Reply